Jump to content

School-to-prison pipeline


Accessing
 Share

Recommended Posts

Junior Supervisor

Junior Supervisor

  • [7] FLAG OFFICER

In the United States, the school-to-prison pipeline (SPP), also known as the school-to-prison link or the schoolhouse-to-jailhouse track, is the disproportionate tendency of minors and young adults from disadvantaged backgrounds to become incarcerated, because of increasingly harsh school and municipal policies. Many experts have credited factors such as school disturbance laws, zero tolerance policies and practices, and an increase in police in schools in creating the pipeline. This has become a hot topic of debate in discussions surrounding educational disciplinary policies as media coverage of youth violence and mass incarceration has grown during the early 21st century.


U.S. School-to-Prison Link increasingly reflects practices of Mass Incarceration unique to the U.S.
The current sociopolitical climate, relating to mass incarceration in the United States, serves as a critical component in increasing the contact the incarceration system has with the United States education system, as patterns of criminalization translate into the school context.[1] Specific practices implemented in United States schools over the past ten years to reduce violence in schools, including zero tolerance policies and an increase in School Resource Officers have created the environment for criminalization of youth in schools. This results from patterns of discipline in schools mirroring law enforcement models.

The disciplinary policies and practices that create an environment for the United States school-to-prison link to occur disproportionately affect disabled, Latino and Black students which is later reflected in the rates of incarceration. Between 1999 and 2007, the percentage of black students being suspended has increased by twelve percent, while the percentage of white students being suspended has declined since the implementation of zero tolerance policies. Of the total incarcerated population in the United States, 61% are Black or Latino.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School-to-prison_pipeline ]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Operative

Operative

  • [1] JUNIOR ENLISTED

Ahh yes, the infamous school-to-prison methodology. Said that it is still continuing to this day, however that is partially due to a populace that remains uneducated on this premise and how once started on this path, it becomes very difficult to diverge away from it. In this line of thinking, where do you guys think it is most prevalent: urban or rural and why? I could go into research but want to ask for your opinion prior.

 

- Shandy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Senior Operative

Senior Operative

  • [7] FLAG OFFICER
On 3/13/2020 at 3:00 AM, Anna Richards said:

To this day I do not know how we come across the topics we do in our meetings, this was one of the better ones but a copy/paste from Wikipedia? Really?

Love the condescending note, you know someone affected by this? I think we all might know just one person. 

On 4/25/2020 at 1:19 PM, Shandykidinkent said:

Ahh yes, the infamous school-to-prison methodology. Said that it is still continuing to this day, however that is partially due to a populace that remains uneducated on this premise and how once started on this path, it becomes very difficult to diverge away from it. In this line of thinking, where do you guys think it is most prevalent: urban or rural and why? I could go into research but want to ask for your opinion prior.

 

- Shandy

Urban and rural both come with its own troubled set of working class dependents. I see now more then ever schools care about their reputation, keeping it up and attractive moving trouble makers to align with the school to prison process.

@Shawn4Japan do you think that this is also on purpose or accident?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Junior Supervisor

Junior Supervisor

  • [7] FLAG OFFICER

Probably by accident, I think it might be a product of just how convenient it is to take a class of 30 children and put 5 trouble makers out of the class into intermediary school and than continue to adhere to whatever rules they set to inevitably be sent to prison.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...