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Freemasonry Misconceptions and Myths


Im Mr Morris
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Attendant

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Anyone have any common things they've heard in pop culture and society about the Freemasons that sound a little insane or too "super secret cultish" to be true? 

 

Freemasonry is commonly seen as being secretive yet the only common secrets are in the actual rituals yet college fraternities are secret about their own rituals. A group keeping its initiations and meetings somewhat behind closed doors is actually rather common. 

 

Freemasons do not let each other get away with crimes and horrible atrocities. Freemasonry is about becoming a better member of society and a better person themselves which in-turn means seeing a fellow brother commit a crime would immediately be against their oath of helping their community and could result in termination from their lodge. 

 

Freemasonry does not make you rich and in fact Freemasonry is more about spending than earning as each respective lodge has an application fee and then a yearly lodge fee to help keep the lodge running. 

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49 minutes ago, ADM S Osman said:

FINALLY, we have reached a Freemason topic. 

Are you a freemason? Is their a relationship between freemasons and public services? 

I am an Entered Apprentice in Freemasonry, yes but I am not in any of the high echelons of my local lodge. By public services do you mean first responders? If so, many first responders are Freemasons. The lodge I attend has eight police officers and three firefighters and one 9-1-1 dispatcher (Me). The connection to Freemasonry has not interrupted the sworn duties of public servants though as part of the brotherhood is to uphold moral standards and corruption/favoritism is surely against those said standards.

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Yes many public servicemen and women I know are freemasons. From Police, Firefighters to municipal court staffers and local government elected persons. I find it fascinating but don't know anything about that world. 

 

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3 minutes ago, ADM S Osman said:

Yes many public servicemen and women I know are freemasons. From Police, Firefighters to municipal court staffers and local government elected persons. I find it fascinating but don't know anything about that world. 

 

A lot of public figures definitely fall into Freemasonry, most of them do it to be connected to their communities in ways aside from their careers. It is quite an in-depth world with different paths you can take beyond a Blue Lodge such as the Scottish or York Rites and then all the way up to the Knights Templar. 
 

I initially made this threat to try and clear up some general questions about Freemasonry to help demonstrate how we aren’t some secret cultist society.

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On 11/29/2020 at 6:21 AM, Mr Morris said:

A lot of public figures definitely fall into Freemasonry, most of them do it to be connected to their communities in ways aside from their careers. It is quite an in-depth world with different paths you can take beyond a Blue Lodge such as the Scottish or York Rites and then all the way up to the Knights Templar. 
 

I initially made this threat to try and clear up some general questions about Freemasonry to help demonstrate how we aren’t some secret cultist society.

You are a freemason? How did you join. 

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13 hours ago, Dale Kilkin said:

You are a freemason? How did you join. 

I can’t say this is the method all states and regions use but in Maine you’d have to directly contact the Grand Lodge in Augusta. When I contacted them they put me through to my local lodge in which the head Master of the lodge talked on the phone with me for quite a bit. He ended up emailing me the lodge application and within the application you have to have two brothers who know you personally sign off on it which can be hard for some as most Freemasons don’t typically identify themselves, though in my case my previous supervisor at my old job who was good friends with me was a Mason (And the individual who got me invested in the idea of joining) and my older brother is also a Mason so they both signed off on it. After the application and said application fee I went to the actual lodge to speak with the Lodge Master and the Senior Warden and the rest beyond that is something I am not supposed to speak about as it involves the actual oaths and specific rituals practiced. Like I said, I don’t know how other states and nations operate it and some places also have different age requirements.

I’m aware a lot of states are an age limit of 21, so I would’ve been one year short though to my luck, Maine’s requirement is only 18.

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